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POPULATION CENSUS RESULTS

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ABOUT THE POPULATION CENSUS

Reference date

Methodological explanations

Method of data collection
Definitions and explanations
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Definitions of census units

Census questionnaire in English


 
Slovenska verzija

Methodological explanations

Definitons and explanations - BUILDINGS AND DWELLINGS

>> Definitions and explanations contents

A building is any structure that has four walls and one or several entrances and is built to be lived in, perform any activity or keep material goods.

At the 2002 Census the Statistical Office for the first time included buildings as an enumeration unit.

Building with dwellings is a structure containing at least one dwelling. Buildings containing only premises other than dwellings by definition (occupied provisional premises, business premises, collective living quarters) are not counted.

Building with dwellings and other living quarters is a structure with at least one dwelling or other living quarter (occupied provisional premises, occupied business premises, dwellings for business purposes only, collective living quarters).

Type of building with regard to construction is defined according to the way the building is constructed; whether it is an individual detached structure, semi detached or attached structure, multi-dwelling structure or some other kind of building.

A detached individual house is a building that stands independently on the ground and is by its original method of construction not a multi-dwelling building (e.g. a block of flats, a skyscraper, etc.), even though there may be more than one dwelling in it.


A semi-detached or row house
is the type of building constructed in a row. A row house has its own entrance, its own house number, and two (or at least one) common walls and a common roof.


A house with agricultural premises
is a building in which beside of the dwelling there are also agricultural premises.


A multi-dwelling building
is a block of flats, a skyscraper or an old urban multi-dwelling building (e.g. buildings in city centres that were built close to one another and by their appearance do not resemble modern multi-dwelling buildings). Multi-dwelling buildings have common staircases from which entrances lead into individual dwellings.


Other type of building
is a building that cannot be classified into any other type, however at least one dwelling or some other occupied premise is located in it (e.g. various office buildings, schools, hospitals, hotels, old people’s homes, etc.).

Type of building with regard to use is defined according to the way the building is used; whether it is used only for residential purposes or it is used also for other purposes. If the building is not used for residential purposes only, its use is defined regarding the major part of floor space used for a certain purpose.

Type of building can also be derived from the number of dwellings and the use of building, by distinguishing between the residential and non-residential buildings the criterion of the type of construction is also considered. The number of dwellings does not include occupied provisional premises, occupied business premises, dwellings used only for business purposes and collective living quarters. Thus, the buildings are divided into four categories:

  • One-dwelling house is a house with one dwelling;

  • Two-dwelling house is a house with two dwellings;

  • Three- or more dwelling building is a building with three or more dwellings (irrespective whether it is an individual detached house, a semi-detached or attached house, a house with agricultural premises or a multi-dwelling building);

  • Non-residential and other buildings are buildings mostly used for non-residential purposes or buildings which mostly contain premises other than dwellings (business buildings, schools, various homes, etc.).

Material of the bearing structure of the building is the material which constitutes the most of the construction (bearing) walls and in the case of the skeleton construction the frame of the building.

Type of roofing is defined according to the material of the roofing. The shape of the roofing is not important (it could be flat, covered with tiles or corrugated).

Floors in a building are counted from the ground floor up. The ground floor and the attic are not counted as floors.


Year of construction
is the year in which the building was constructed. For damaged or almost demolished buildings which were later on reconstructed or improved, the year of reconstruction or improvement is taken into account.

Average number of dwellings per building is the ratio between the number of all dwellings in the buildings and the number of all buildings with dwellings in a certain administrative spatial unit.

A dwelling is any structurally unified whole intended for residence, with one or more rooms, with or without appropriate utility spaces (kitchen, bathroom, toilet, hallway, larder, etc.) and with at least one separate entrance.


A collective living quarter is a group of premises intended for habitation of a larger number of persons and used as a usual residence of at least one person at the time of the census.


An occupied dwelling is a dwelling occupied by households or temporarily present persons who live in the dwelling temporarily because of work or schooling.

Another dwelling that the household uses at the same address is also included. At the 1991 Census these dwellings were not considered to be occupied.

Number of persons in a dwelling covers:

  • residents (members of households)

  • temporarily present.

Compared to previous censuses, in accordance with the new definition of population the number of people in the dwelling no longer covers persons absent for over a year because of living abroad.

Dwellings occupied by households are dwellings in which at least one household lives. Dwellings occupied only by temporarily present persons are not included. Another dwelling which the household uses at the same address is not included.

Dwellings occupied by persons are dwellings in which households or temporarily present persons live. Another dwelling which the household uses at the same address is not included.

Dwelling for residence and business purposes is an occupied dwelling which is at the same time used also for performing certain business activity.

 

A dwelling for business activity is a dwelling in which nobody lives and is entirely used for performing business activity. In architectural sense, the dwelling is not converted into business premises. This dwelling is not included in the number of dwellings.


A temporarily unoccupied dwelling
is a dwelling that is new and not yet settled in, or a dwelling that is vacant because of moving, adaptation, repairs or a dwelling the owner of which lives in another dwelling and does not use this dwelling and does not let it to other people.

 

An unoccupied (abandoned) dwelling is a dwelling that has been abandoned for a long time because the owner moved away and did not let the dwelling to other people or the owner died and the heirs did not let the dwelling to other people or they do not use it for rest and recreation.


Dwellings for occasional use are dwellings for leisure and recreation and dwellings for the time of seasonal work in agriculture.


Dwellings for leisure and recreation are by definition dwellings that are used occasionally or for several months a year for rest and recreation.


Dwellings for the time of seasonal work in agriculture
are dwellings that households use only during seasonal work in agriculture.


The number of dwellings
in a census comprises all dwellings except dwellings that are used only for performing business activity, other occupied premises and collective living quarters.

According to international recommendations for censuses, conventional dwellings cover occupied and unoccupied dwellings and dwellings for occasional use. In the 1991 Census the number of dwellings for which detailed results were published comprised only occupied and unoccupied dwellings (data on dwellings for leisure and recreation were shown separately). For comparison with the 2002 Census, we have recalculated some data from the 1991 Census in the way that we considered the same concept for the number of dwellings as used in the 2002 Census.


Other occupied premises
are premises that are by definition not dwellings but were used as dwellings during the time of the census (occupied business premises, occupied provisional premises).


Occupied business premises
are occupied shops, offices, rooms in hotels, hospitals and old people's homes where households live which are not users of services of these homes, etc.


Occupied provisional premises
are huts, garages, basements, wagons, trailers, tents, etc.

Type of ownership is defined according to the fact whether the owner of the dwelling is a natural person, state, municipality, public funds, various organisations, etc.

Dwelling in the private property of the natural person can be:

  • Owned by the persons who live in the dwelling;

  • Privately-owned by various individuals who do not live in the dwelling but they let the dwelling or they use it occasionally;

  • Unoccupied.

Owner-occupied dwelling is a dwelling occupied by a household the member of which is the owner/co-owner of the dwelling.

Dwelling in the property of the public sector is a dwelling which is owned by the state, municipalities, public funds, public companies or public institutes.

The position of dwelling in the building shows the location of the dwelling in the building – in the basement, ground floor, floor above the ground floor, in two or more floors or attic. Floors are counted from the ground floor up. The ground floor and attic are not counted as floors. If a dwelling is in two or more floors but in a multi-dwelling or multistorey building (e.g. block of flats, skyscraper), the position of the dwelling is defined by the number of the floor on which the entrance to the dwelling is located.

 

Useful floor space of a dwelling is the sum of useful floor space of all rooms, kitchen and other utility spaces (bathroom, toilet, hallway) and areas of enclosed terraces and verandas. The area of the room and kitchen which are architecturally separated from the dwelling but are used as a part of the dwelling all the year round is also taken into account. The area of open terraces and balconies, architecturally separated utility spaces, garages, cellars and attics unsuitable for living is not taken into account.

Average floor space of the dwelling is the ratio between the total useful floor space of dwellings and the number of all dwellings in certain administrative spatial unit.

Average useful floor space per person is calculated per each individual dwelling occupied by persons. It is the ratio between the useful floor space of dwelling and the number of persons in this dwelling. The number of persons in the dwelling includes members of the household and temporarily present persons. In this case, the number of occupied dwellings does not include another dwelling used at the same address.


A room
is a space intended for living and separated from other residential area with walls. It has direct daylight and its floor space is at least 6m2.


Room used only for business purposes is a room used only for performing a certain business activity. It is included in the number of rooms in the dwelling.


A separate room
is a small dwelling with one room without a kitchen and bathroom. It can have a hallway, toilet or larder, however the total useful floor space of these utility spaces must not exceed 6m2.


A bed sit is a small dwelling with one room, a bathroom and a hallway, and with or without a small kitchen.

Utility spaces in the dwelling are kitchen, bathroom and toilet. A dwelling does not have these premises if they are in the same building but out of the dwelling or if they are outside the building in the yard (e.g. toilet).

Other different premises within the dwelling can be balcony, terrace, atrium, winter garden, pantry or cellar. A dwelling can have one, more or none of the mentioned premises.

A dwelling has installation of water supply, sewage, electricity, gas or central heating if certain installation is in at least one premise of the dwelling. It does not matter if the installation is connected to a public system or some other object.

A dwelling has a telephone if there is a connection to a stationary telephone network in the dwelling.

A dwelling has a cable television if there is a connection to a cable television network in the dwelling.

Type of heating is defined according to the way the dwelling was heated in the last heating season.

Sources of heating are defined according to the fuels and energy used for heating the dwelling in the last heating season. A dwelling can have more than one source of heating. The dwelling is heated if at least one premise in the dwelling is heated.

Main source of heating is the source mostly used in the last heating season.

The year of the last renovation is the most recent year in which the dwelling was renovated or some major works have been done by which the outer or inner walls could be changed, the order or purpose of the dwelling could be altered, material life of the dwellings could be prolonged or the value of the dwelling could be significantly increased.

Renovation is also reconstruction of the attic, cellar or business premise into the dwelling, etc.

As households in dwellings only private households residing in dwellings are considered, excluding households living in occupied premises other than dwellings by definition (e.g. occupied provisional or business premises, collective living quarters). There can be more than one household in the dwelling.

Tenure status refers to arrangements under which a household occupies all or part of a dwelling.
 

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CENSUS PUBLICATIONS

First Release


PDF - 108 KB

 

  Basic data on the population, families, buildings and dwellings in Slovenia, and changes between the 1991 and 2002 censuses.

Rapid Reports, Population

Census data show that demographic characteristics of the population in Slovenia, its way of living and habitation are changing.
 

Slovenia

PDF - 0,95 MB

 
  Municicipalities overview

PDF - 2,16 MB

Censuses in Slovenia 1948–1991 and Census 2002


PDF - 5,23 MB

  Short analytical overview of the population, households and housing in Slovenia in words, pictures and figures.
 

EXPLANATIONS ABOUT CENSUS

 

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia,
Vožarski pot 12, 1000 LJUBLJANA,


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