Statistični urad Republike Slovenije

POPULATION CENSUS RESULTS

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ABOUT THE POPULATION CENSUS

Reference date

Methodological explanations

Method of data collection
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Data confidentiality

Definitions of census units

Census questionnaire in English


 
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Methodological explanations

Definitons and explanations - POPULATION

>> Definitions and explanations contents


Usual residence
is the settlement in which a person spends the daily period of rest.


Inhabitants are people whose usual residence is the place of enumeration (have their households there) and up to the reference date were not absent from the household more than a year.

Comparing the 2002 Census data with the data collected with previous censuses, one needs to take into account that the definition of the population changed. Data after World War II (from 1948 to 1991) took into account population with permanent residence in Slovenia (de iure). Taken into account were people who declared that they have permanent residence in the place of enumeration, irrespective of whether they were temporarily absent at the time of the census. Temporarily absent people were those who were absent for a short time and also those who were working abroad and family members who were living with them abroad (migrant workers), irrespective of the duration of their work or stay abroad.

At the 2002 Census we took into account international recommendations for censuses according to which a country's population are only those people who actually live in its territory. A person’s citizenship is not important, so that the inhabitants of Slovenia are both citizens of Slovenia and foreigners.

The most important difference between the definition of the population at the 1991 Census and at the 2002 Census is that in the latter people who have permanent or temporary residence in Slovenia but have been living abroad for over a year are no longer considered to be the population of Slovenia. In addition, at the 2002 Census we took into account for the first time the duration of stay in Slovenia, so that the population of Slovenia are also those immigrants who have been living in Slovenia for at least a year, irrespective of whether they have a registered residence in Slovenia or not.

At the 2002 Census we considered people who live in certain institutions (e.g. old people's homes) as residents of the settlement in which the institution in located, while at the 1991 Census they were considered as residents of the settlement of their permanent residence.

Data on the population of Slovenia at 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses were recalculated so that the number of persons who were temporarily living abroad at the time of the census (migrant workers) was subtracted from the total population. At the 1953 and 1961 censuses the category of migrant workers did not exist. Data were recalculated only for Slovenia. Because of administrative spatial changes in Slovenia in the last 30 years, we did not recalculate the data for smaller spatial units. At the 1971 Census there were 48,086 migrant workers, at the 1981 Census 53,483 and at the 1991 Census 52,631.


Temporarily present are people who:

have their usual residence (household) in another place in Slovenia, but were temporarily present in the place of the interview because of work, schooling, family or other reasons;
have no usual residence in Slovenia because they have been living in Slovenia for less than a year and their usual residence a year before the census was in a foreign country.


Absent for over a year because of living abroad are persons who have registered residence in Slovenia but for reasons of employment at a foreign employer or self-employment, schooling, family or other reasons have been living abroad for over a year.


Citizenship
is permanent legal relationship of a person towards the country which acknowledges this person’s special legal status.


Age
is the time a person has lived between his or her birth and the census reference date (31 March). It is expressed in completed years of age.


Mean
age is a weighted arithmetic mean of the age of a given group of population. In this issue of Rapid Reports mean age is calculated from one-year age groups.


Ageing
index is the ratio between the old population (aged 65 and over) and the young population (aged 0–14) multiplied by 100.


Marital
status is a legal condition which defines the relationship of a person towards other persons. It is decisive whether or not a person has been married before. With regard to that a person can be: single, married, widowed or divorced.


Ethnic affiliation and religion

Compared to previous censuses, at the 2002 Census collecting data on ethnic affiliation and religion was slightly changed. According to provisions of Article 10 of the Act Regulating the Census of Population, Households and Housings in the Republic of Slovenia (OJ RS 66/2000, 26/2001), all people aged 14 and over had to declare their ethnic affiliation and religion THEMSELVES. For children younger than 14 the answer could be given by their parents, adopters or guardians.

The question was intended for all persons. The interviewer had to read or show to the respondents the options and warn them that they need not declare their ethnic affiliation and religion. The answer to the question on ethnic affiliation and religion had to be marked or entered exactly as given by the respondent.

For household members who on the census reference date (31 March 2002) were at least 14 years old but were absent from the household at the time of the interview or the interviewer’s visit or did not want to declare their ethnic affiliation and religion in the presence of other household members or the interviewer, the data on ethnic affiliation and religion were collected with the Statement on the Nationality/Ethnicity and Religion (P-3/NV questionnaire), which was left by the interviewer together with the envelope in the household. In this way every person could fill in the Statement on the Nationality/Ethnicity and Religion and send it to the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia. Sending of the Statement on the Nationality/Ethnicity and Religion was not obligatory. The office took into account only those Statements on the Nationality/Ethnicity and Religion that were signed.


Ethnic
affiliation is being a member of a nation or an ethnic group. In accordance with the constitutional principles of the equality of nations and ethnic groups, a person has the right to declare his or her ethnic affiliation (Constitution of the Republic of Slovenia, OJ RS 33/91-I, Article 61).

The question on ethnic affiliation was asked in all censuses after World War II. In 1953 and 1961 censuses for children younger than 10 and in 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses for children younger than 15 the answers were provided by their parents or other representatives (guardians, adopters). For persons who were absent at the time of the interviewer’s visit, in the past censuses the answer on ethnic affiliation could be provided by an adult member of the household.

In individual censuses the same classification was used for processing the data on ethnic affiliation, but it was supplemented with new answers on ethnic affiliation. One needs to take into account methodological differences in people declaring themselves as Muslims, Yugoslavs and Bosniacs, and people declaring themselves by regional affiliation.

People who regarded themselves as Muslims in the sense of ethnic and not religious affiliation could declare themselves Muslims for the first time in 1961. Before 1961 they were declared as “Yugoslavs – undeclared”. At the 1961 Census people who did not give detailed ethnic affiliation could give the answer “Yugoslavs – ethnically undeclared”. The same answer was recorded for those who stated regional affiliation (such as Upper Carniolan, Dalmatian, etc.). In 1971 a classification was adopted which suited constitutional provisions on the equality of all nations and ethnic groups and the right of people to declare their ethnic affiliation, including the right not to do so. According to the classification valid at 1981, 1991 and 2002 censuses, the population is classified into two groups by ethnic affiliation:

declared;
undeclared.

With the creation of independent states in the territory of former Yugoslavia, the classification of ethnically declared population includes Bosniacs. This term was introduced by the Constitution of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1994. Among ethnically declared we still show Muslims, who declared so in the sense of ethnic and not religious affiliation.

People shown as ethnically undeclared are:

Yugoslavs;
Bosnians (in the past censuses they were shown as regionally declared);
regionally declared (e.g. Istrians, Dalmatians, etc.);
others (people who preferred to be ethnically undeclared).


Religion


In censuses after World War II the data on religion were collected only in 1953, 1991 and 2002. At the 1953 Census the data on religion were given to the interviewer’s by parents or other legal representatives (guardians, adopters) for children younger than 14 and at the 1991 Census for children younger than 15. For persons absent at the time of the interviewer’s visit, in the past censuses the answer on religion could be provided by an adult member of the household.

For determining religion only the attitude towards religion was important and not whether or not the person is officially registered as a member of a religious community. Religious conviction of a person was also not important.

In 1991 the answers on religion were merged into 11 main groups. The answers collected with the 2002 Census are merged into 14 groups. Compared to 1991, new groups were Evangelical, other Christian religions and agnostics.

At 1991 and 2002 censuses, people who did not want to declare their religion could:

answer that they do not belong to any religion, although they are believers;
answer that they do not belong to any religion because they are not believers (atheists);
decide not to answer the question on religion.


Mother
tongue is the language that a person learned in his or her early childhood in the family or in another primary environment if the child lived at relatives, in institutions, etc. If a person learned several languages in his or her childhood, mother tongue is the language which the person identifies as his or her mother tongue.

With the creation of independent states in the territory of former Yugoslavia, the names of languages changed. In Croatia Croatian is spoken, in Serbia Serbian is spoken, while in Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian are spoken. In Montenegro a version of Serbian is spoken, although the name Montenegrin is also used.

Every respondent could decide on his or her mother tongue freely. Therefore, the classification valid at previous censuses was supplemented with new answers, including the Montenegrin, Bosnian and Bosniac languages. The data on the last two languages are shown as the Bosnian language. We kept the Serbo-Croatian language in the classification because this answer was very frequent.


First
residence is the settlement (in Slovenia or abroad) in which the mother of the person had her residence when the person was born.


Immigrants
are people who had their first residence outside Slovenia and have been living in Slovenia for at least a year.

The definition of immigrants at the 2002 Census differs from the definition used at 1961-1991 censuses. At 1961-1991 censuses the data on immigration from abroad were derived from the data on the last migration (country in which a person had residence before immigrating to Slovenia). Immigrants were also people who had their first residence in Slovenia but emigrated and later on returned to Slovenia (re-emigration). Those people who had their first residence outside Slovenia and after immigrating to Slovenia moved to another settlement in Slovenia (internal migration) were not shown as immigrants. At 1961-1991 censuses the minimum one-year time period of residence was not taken into account.

Household reference person is a household member aged 15 years or over selected by the household members themselves with the purpose to determine relations to other household members.


Relation to the household reference person is relation between the reference person and a household member.


Family status determines whether a household member belongs to the family or not and the types of families. Family members are defined on the basis of generations. The first generation is composed of spouse, cohabitant and lone father or lone mother. It is not important that children (second generation) are natural descendants of family members of the first generation.


Type of migration is a characteristic of a migration with regard to the boundaries of the territory (international migration and internal migration) and with regard to the observed territory (migration between settlements in a municipality, migration between municipalities, migration between statistical regions).


Reason for migration is the basic motive or prevailing ground (e.g. employment, buying a dwelling, marriage) why the migrant changed the last usual residence.


Usually spoken language is the language used for communication between household or family members (verbal or writing). A person can use one, two or more languages. If a person uses three or more languages, he/she had to determine the two most commonly used.


Number of live-born children is the total number of children born alive regardless of whether they are living or dead. Stillborn children are excluded.


Average number of live-born children per woman is the ratio between the total number of all live-born children and the number of women aged 15 and over. Women who have not (yet) given birth are included.


Temporarily
absent are inhabitants absent less than one year who:
- were absent at the critical moment of enumeration accidentally;
- because of work, schooling, family or other reasons temporarily live in another settlement in Slovenia or abroad.


A migrant is a person who immigrated to the place of residence from another settlement in Slovenia or from abroad.
 

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CENSUS PUBLICATIONS

First Release


PDF - 108 KB

 

  Basic data on the population, families, buildings and dwellings in Slovenia, and changes between the 1991 and 2002 censuses.

Rapid Reports, Population

Census data show that demographic characteristics of the population in Slovenia, its way of living and habitation are changing.
 

Slovenia

PDF - 0,95 MB

 
  Municicipalities overview

PDF - 2,16 MB

Censuses in Slovenia 1948–1991 and Census 2002


PDF - 5,23 MB

  Short analytical overview of the population, households and housing in Slovenia in words, pictures and figures.
 

EXPLANATIONS ABOUT CENSUS

 

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia,
Vožarski pot 12, 1000 LJUBLJANA,


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