Living conditions, Slovenia, 2020

Housing conditions and material capabilities of the households in 2020

Housing conditions of households in 2020 were about the same as in 2019. Unexpected financial expenses could be handled by more households and more households could afford one-week holidays.

  • 17 June 2021 at 10:30
  • |
  • final data

What were the housing conditions of households in 2020?

In 2020, almost 8 out of 10 households (78%) estimated that their dwellings were in good condition; meaning they had no difficulties such as leaking roof, damp walls/floors/foundation, rot in window frames or floor. The share was 1 percentage point lower than in 2019.

Among the households that had one or more of the above mentioned difficulties, the most common problem in 2020 was dampness (15% of households reported having problems with damp walls or foundations, which is 1 percentage point more than in 2019).

More than half (57%) of households that were severely materially deprived reported housing difficulties, and among households that were not severely materially deprived, about one-fifth had housing difficulties.

Other factors also have an impact on the quality of living, for example pollution, noise and difficulties with crime, violence or vandalism.


Households that lived in densely populated areas had more problems with pollution, noise and crime than those that lived in sparsely populated areas.


Financial capabilities of the households in 2020

Housing costs in 2020 were a heavy burden for 27% of households, which is 5 percentage points fewer than in 2019. For 14% of households, housing costs were not a burden at all, which is 1 percentage point fewer than in 2019. In the last 12 months before being interviewed in 2020, 9% of households were in arrears with utility costs. In comparison with one year ago, the share of households that were in arrears was lower by 2 percentage points. If we compare the data by different types of households, we see that the share of households in arrears with housing costs was the highest in single-parent households (22% of such households) and the lowest in households with two adults without dependent children (7%).

An important aspect of how people live is their subjective perception. The share of households that estimated that they were able to make ends meet without difficulty (easy, very easy) increased compared to 2019 by 2 percentage points (2020: 20%). The share of households that made ends meet with difficulty (difficulty, great difficulty) stayed the same in both years: 20%.

Among households that lived above the at-risk-of-poverty threshold, 23% of households made ends meet without difficulty, which is 3 percentage points more than in 2019. Among households that lived below the at-risk-of-poverty threshold, there were 9% such households, which is about same as one year ago. At the same time, among households living below the at-risk-of-poverty threshold, the share of those that reported having struggled to make ends meet stayed about the same in both years (2019: 47%; 2020: 46%).


37% of tenant households declared that they had difficulty making ends meet (difficulty, great difficulty). The same problem was reported by 18% of households that were owners of the dwelling. The shares were about the same as the year before.

The share of households that made ends meet without difficulty was the highest in the Gorenjska statistical region (30%) and the lowest in the Pomurska statistical region (11%).

In 2020, unexpected financial expenses in the amount of EUR 650 could be handled by 66% of households. Unexpected financial expenses could be handled by 17% of households that had great difficulty or difficulty in making ends meet and by 94% of households that made ends meet very easily or easily.


How many households in 2020 could afford annual holidays outside home for all members?

In 2020, 77% of households could afford annual holidays outside home for all household members, including holidays at their relatives, summer home, etc., which was 1 percentage point more than in the previous year and the highest share ever recorded in Slovenia.

According to the type of household, the share was the highest in households with two parents and at least one dependent child (91%) and the lowest in one person households (63%). 45% of households that were below the at-risk-of-poverty threshold could afford annual holidays outside home.

The share of households that could afford annual holidays outside home for all household members was the highest in the Osrednjeslovenska statistical region (84%) and the lowest in the Koroška statistical region (65%).


Overall life satisfaction in 2020

Overall life satisfaction was assessed the highest by people living in Gorenjska, Goriška and Jugovzhodna statistical regions: 7.6 (on the scale from 0 – Not at all satisfied, to 10 – Completely satisfied), which was 0.2 higher than the national average (7.4) and lower than in the previous year (7.5). Overall life satisfaction was assessed the lowest by people living in the Koroška statistical region (6.8).

The share of persons who were severely materially deprived was the highest in the Koroška statistical region (5.8%) and the lowest in the Posavska statistical region (0.8%). The average assessment of overall life satisfaction in Koroška was 0.4 lower than in Posavska (7.2). However, despite the lowest severe material deprivation rate, overall life satisfaction in Posavska was not among the highest in the country. This means that the assessment of overall satisfaction does not depend only on financial and material aspects, but also, for example, on satisfaction with health, family, friends, social networks, hobbies, free time, etc.


The data indicate that life satisfaction mostly depends on the health status of people. Those who in 2020 assessed their health as very good (23% of people aged 16+) were also among the most satisfied with their lives (average self-assessment 8.4).


A small amount of money that persons spent most weeks on themselves

Most weeks in 2020, 89% of persons aged 16 years or more spent a small amount of money on themselves, which is 1 percentage point lower than in 2019. About 5% of persons could not afford to do that and for about 5% of persons there were other reasons for this. The share of such persons was higher among younger persons, pupils/students, employed persons, more educated persons and those who are better off.



METHODOLOGICAL NOTE
The source for data on living conditions is the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (SILC). Today we are publishing final data for 2020 in comparison with 2019. The data were collected with the survey questionnaire in the first half of the year for 2019, and in two periods for 2020. Due to the COVID-19 epidemic, the data were collected in 2020 from 15 January to 15 March (first collection period - before the health crisis) and from 15 May to 15 September (second collection period - during the health crisis or after the first wave of the COVID-19 epidemic). Data for 2020, due to this specific situation, are not fully comparable with data from previous years.

The provisional data published in the First Release on 4 February 2021 are supplemented with final data. The majority of the final data are not different from the provisional data. More detailed data will be published in the SiStat Database on 8 July 2021. The final data from the ad hoc module about »Over-indebtedness, consumption and property« will be published on 23 September 2021, and the detailed data from this ad hoc module on 21 October 2021.
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