Well-being, Slovenia, 2018

Are we satisfied with personal relationships, time use, life as a whole? Are we happy?

In 2018 people were most satisfied with personal relations with relatives, friends, neighbours. The elderly were more satisfied with their time use. Overall life satisfaction was significantly influenced by health and feeling happy. Six out of ten felt happy all or most of the time.

  • 9/12/2019
  • |
  • final data

In 2018, the Survey on Living Conditions (SILC) included an ad hoc module with which we measured subjective wellbeing of residents of Slovenia aged 16 and over. Different types of satisfaction were evaluated or appraised on the scale from 0 – Not at all satisfied to 10 – Completely satisfied. The psychological wellbeing was also measured as self-rated affects or emotions in the past four weeks. Some questions were also included in the survey in 2013.


Most satisfied with personal relationships with relatives, friends, neighbours


The average self-assessment of satisfaction with personal relationships with relatives, friends, neighbours, colleagues at work was 8.6, which is the highest assessment of all measurements of satisfaction in this survey. 92% of persons assessed their satisfaction with personal relationships with 7 to 10. As expected, the most satisfied with personal relationships were pupils and students (9.0). Compared to 2013, the level of satisfaction with personal relationships increased by 0.3.

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More satisfied with the financial situation of their households  

Most people assessed the financial situation of their households with 7 and 8 (39%); 13% with the highest assessment (9 and 10), and 17% with the lowest assessment (0–4). The average level of satisfaction with the financial situation of the household compared to 2013 increased by 0.7 (from 5.6 to 6.3).


The level of satisfaction with the financial situation is also greatly influenced by the subjective perception of financial situation. Those who estimated that they made ends meet easily or very easily also gave very high assessment (average self-assessment: 8.1). On the other hand, those who made ends meet with great difficulty or with difficulty were among the most dissatisfied with their financial situation (3.8), which was a lower self-assessment than of those classified in the lowest income quintile (4.9). 
 

Are we satisfied with our jobs?

The average self-assessment of satisfaction with the job was 7.5. There were no significant differences between employed and self-employed or between men and women. In terms of the fields of activity in which they work, the level of satisfaction was highest in information and communication activities, and education (in both 8.1) and the lowest in wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles (7.1).


A third of persons very satisfied with the amount of leisure time; the elderly the most satisfied with time use

A third of people assessed their satisfaction with the amount of leisure time with the highest assessment (9 and 10). The average self-assessment was 7.2, which was 0.4 more than in 2013 (6.8). Between men and women there were no significant differences. However, there were differences in age classes; the least satisfied with the amount of leisure time were 35–44-year-olds and 45–54-years-olds (both 6.7), and the most satisfied people aged 65 years or more (7.9).

 

  
What has the greatest impact on overall life satisfaction?

Average assessment of overall life satisfaction in 2018 was 7.3; the highest value of this indicator since we started to measured it in 2012. Overall life satisfaction did not differ between men and women, but depended greatly on health, position in the labour market, financial situation, education and many other factors (leisure, friends, personal relationships, etc.). Pupils and students had a high level of life satisfaction (average self-assessment: 8.4). The data show that the level of life satisfaction was significantly influenced by the health status of persons.

 

The level of satisfaction is also closely related to feeling happy. Those who were happy all the time assessed their overall life satisfaction with 8.5, while those who in the past four weeks were never happy assessed their overall life satisfaction with 4.5. 

 

Are more people happy or nervous?

In the past four weeks before the survey in 2018, nearly six out of ten people aged 16+ were happy all of the time or most of the time. There were no significant differences between men and women. During the same period, 12% of people were very nervous all or most of the time. Women were very nervous more than men; 14% of women were very nervous all of the time or most of the time, while the share for men was 10%.

Differences were also noticeable in terms of age classes, especially young people (16–24 years) compared to the elderly (65 years or more). Young people (16–24 years) felt happier than older people did (65 years or more). However, young people were more nervous compared to older people. A gender gap is also noticeable among young people: 24% of young women were very nervous all of the time or most of the time, while the share for young men was 11%.  

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Compared to 2013, the share of those who felt happy all or most of the time decreased by 6 percentage points (2013: 65%; 2018: 59%). The share of those who felt very nervous all or most of the time was at about the same level in both years (12%).

 

More than a half felt calm and peaceful most of the time

62% of people aged 16+ felt calm and peaceful all or most of the time in the past four weeks before the survey in 2018, which was 5 percentage points less than in 2013 (67%). The share of men who felt calm and peaceful all or most of the time was slightly higher than the share of women. 

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66% of people aged 16+ never felt downhearted or depressed in the past four weeks before the survey in 2018, which was 6 percentage points more than in 2013 (60%). The share of those who had such feelings all or most of the time was the same in both years (3% each). Self-assessment of general health was strongly linked to people feeling ‘downhearted or depressed’; one fifth of those who considered their health as very bad expressed that they were feeling downhearted or depressed all or most of the time.

 

More detailed information about the subjective wellbeing of Slovenia can be found in the attached excel file. 

METHODOLOGICAL NOTE

The attached excel file contains detailed data on the ad-hoc module »Wellbeing«, which is a part of the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (SILC).
The source for data on living conditions is the Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (SILC), which was implemented with the survey in 2018 and the use of registers and administrative data mostly for 2017.

Visit our SiStat database.