Food waste, Slovenia, 2017

A resident of Slovenia discarded on average 64 kg of food in 2017

In Slovenia, almost 131,800 tonnes of food waste was generated in 2017 or on average 64 kg per capita. Half of the food waste was generated by households. In households, food waste accounted for 11% of all household municipal waste generated.

  • 12/11/2018
  • |
  • final data
How much food is wasted?

In 2013–2016 the amount of food waste increased and in 2017 slightly decreased compared to the previous year. In 2017, a resident of Slovenia discarded on average 64 kg of food, 4% less than in 2016, when they discarded on average 67 kg of food, and at the same time 11% more than in 2013, when they discarded on average 57 kg of food.

Out of 131,800 tonnes of food waste generated in Slovenia in 2017, it was estimated that 38% was the edible part, which could be reduced or avoided by raising awareness and proper attitude towards food and 62% was the inedible part, e.g. bones, bones, peels, egg shells, shells, hulls, etc., which mostly cannot be avoided.


Where is food waste generated?

Half of all food waste is generated in households. In 2017, households in Slovenia generated almost 67,600 tonnes of food waste; compared to 2016, this amount was slightly more than 1% lower, and compared to 2013 it was just over 7% higher.

A third of the food waste originates from catering and other food-serving activities, e.g. in schools, kindergartens, hospitals, old people homes. In these activities, less than 40,600 tonnes of food waste was generated in 2017, which is almost 8% less than in 2016 and almost 6% more than in 2013.

Slightly more than a tenth of food waste is generated in distribution and food stores due to transport damages, improper storage, expired "use by" date etc. In 2017, about 13,100 tonnes of food waste was generated in this activity, or almost 10% less than in 2016, when around 14,500 tonnes of food waste was generated in the mentioned activity.

A little less than a tenth of the food waste originates from food production (including primary food production). In 2017, this activity generated almost 10,500 tonnes of food waste, which is around 2% less than in 2016, but at the same time almost 32% more than in 2013. The residues of organic origin that are deriving from the activity of food production and are diverted to animal feed production do not belong to food waste.



Where does food waste end up?

Food waste that ends up in the waste management system is mostly processed in biogas plants, followed by processing in composting plants. The share of food waste processed in biogas plants increased during the 2013–2016 period (from 35% in 2013 to 48% in 2016), and in 2017 slightly decreased (to 46%). The share of food waste processed in composting plants ranged between 29% and 34% between 2013 and 2017. In 2017, almost 39,600 tonnes of food waste was processed in composting plants, or 30% of food waste generated in 2017.

In accordance with the current waste legislation, after 2015 all food waste collected together with mixed municipal waste must be biologically stabilized in the plants for mechanical biological treatment of mixed municipal waste (MBT) before disposal. The share of food waste that was biologically stabilized before disposal increased in 2013–2017 and stood at 22% in 2017.

Other food waste treatment includes processes such as co-incineration and incineration, oil refinement, other biological recovery processes and disposal. In 2013–2017, the share of other food waste treatment decreased (from 23% in 2013 to 2% in 2017), mainly due to the reduction in the amounts of directly disposed food waste.

METHODOLOGICAL NOTE
For the first time since 2016, when the publication Food among Waste was released, SURS publishes revised data on the amounts of food waste and its treatment for a longer period (2013–2017). The audit is the result of another internationally supported project, which was intended to upgrade the methodology for statistical monitoring of food waste generation and treatment in Slovenia, thus improving the quality of data on food waste at the national level.

At the same time with the publication of the revised data on the amount of food waste and its treatment for the 2013–2017 period, some waste indicators for 2017 are published in the SI-STAT Database. These are part of a comprehensive set of indicators for monitoring the achievement of sustainable development goals in the European Union, which was prepared for this purpose by Eurostat.
Detailed data and time series are available in the SI-STAT database.
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